Down Along with That Devil's Bones: A Reckoning with Monuments, Memory, and the Legacy of White Supremacy

Down Along with That Devil's Bones: A Reckoning with Monuments, Memory, and the Legacy of White Supremacy Review

“We can no longer see ourselves as minor spectators or weary watchers of history a­fter finishing this astonishing work of nonfiction.” —Kiese Laymon, author of Heavy

In Down Along with That Devil’s Bones, journalist Connor Towne O’Neill takes a deep dive into American history, exposing the still-raging battles over monuments dedicated to one of the most notorious Confederate generals, Nathan Bedford Forrest. Through the lens of these conflicts, O’Neill examines the legacy of white supremacy in America, in a sobering and fascinating work.

When O’Neill first moved to Alabama, as a white Northerner, he felt somewhat removed from the racism Confederate monuments represented. Then one day in Selma, he stumbled across a group of citizens protecting a monument to Forrest, the officer who became the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. O’Neill sets off to visit other disputed memorials to Forrest across the South, talking with men and women who believe they are protecting their heritage, and those who have a different view of the man’s poisonous history.

O’Neill’s reporting and thoughtful, deeply personal analysis make it clear that white supremacy is not a regional affliction but is in fact coded into the DNA of the entire country. Down Along with That Devil’s Bones presents an important and eye-opening account of how we got from Appomattox to Charlottesville, and where, if we can truly understand and transcend our past, we could be headed next.

Title:Down Along with That Devil's Bones: A Reckoning with Monuments, Memory, and the Legacy of White Supremacy
Edition Language:English

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    Down Along with That Devil's Bones: A Reckoning with Monuments, Memory, and the Legacy of White Supremacy Reviews

  • Raymond

    Down Along With That Devil’s Bones: A Reckoning with Monuments, Memory, and the Legacy of White Supremacy by Connor O’Neill is a book about the Confederate General and first Grand Wizard of the KK...

  • Faith

    In 2015, the author became interested in Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest when he stumbled upon one of his monuments in Selma’s Old Live Oak Cemetery. It happened to be the 50th anniversar...

  • Carolien

    As a South African, I have watched us deal with monuments and statues to apartheid prime ministers and colonialists over the past three decades. Initially the focus was on renaming streets and removin...

  • Paperclippe

    I annotated and highlighted so many things while reading this. I have so much to say, and no idea how to say it - but that's okay, because O'Neill says it so well.Okay. Stepping back. Down Along with ...

  • Sahitya

    This was an eye opening read because I had heard of Nathan Bedford Forrest but didn’t know much about him. It was fascinating how the author takes the story of activists trying to get this KKK grand...

  • Pete

    disclaimer, i know and like connor, so i am predisposed to like his bookin which an inquisitive reporter takes a long look at confederate memorialization, specifically in the name and shape of nathan ...

  • Janet

    READ THIS BOOK!When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are in #COVID19 #socialisolation...

  • David Wineberg

    The controversy over confederate statues and monuments needs to be addressed. Connor O’Neill was in all the right places at the right times to reveal the depths and depravity of the movements to pre...

  • Margie

    A deeply disturbing exploration of the forces for & against Confederate monuments (focusing on those memorializing Nathan Bedford Forrest - a notorious slave trader, Confederate general and first Gran...

  • Alysa H.

    I wish that this book could have been ready for publication just a few months earlier than it was, because it would have gotten more attention then, during what appears to have been 2020’s high peak...