Kaddish.com

Kaddish.com Review

The Pulitzer finalist delivers his best work yet--a brilliant, streamlined comic novel, reminiscent of early Philip Roth and of his own most masterful stories, about a son's failure to say Kaddish for his father

Larry is an atheist in a family of orthodox Memphis Jews. When his father dies, it is his responsibility as the surviving son to recite the Kaddish, the Jewish prayer for the dead, every day for eleven months. To the horror and dismay of his mother and sisters, Larry refuses--thus imperiling the fate of his father's soul. To appease them, and in penance for failing to mourn his father correctly, he hatches an ingenious if cynical plan, hiring a stranger through a website called kaddish.com to recite the daily prayer and shepherd his father's soul safely to rest.

This is Nathan Englander's freshest and funniest work to date--a satire that touches, lightly and with unforgettable humor, on the conflict between religious and secular worlds, and the hypocrisies that run through both. A novel about atonement; about spiritual redemption; and about the soul-sickening temptations of the internet, which, like God, is everywhere.

Title:Kaddish.com

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    Kaddish.com Reviews

  • Ron Charles

    “Kaddish.com” is a novel, but its first part serves as another reminder of Nathan Englander’s extraordinary skill as a short story writer. Set 20 years before the rest of the book, it describes ...

  • Elyse Walters

    I’ve read many short stories by Nathan Englander, but this is the first novel I’ve read by him. When the story begins, we learn that Larry’s father has just died. He’s at his sisters house in ...

  • Lark Benobi

    People compare Nathan Englander to Philip Roth and it's a fair comparison only in that they are both Jewish and they both have a talent for writing scenes that include masturbation. But Roth lived at ...

  • Alex

    2.5Like many secular Jews, I am a fan of Philip Roth, whose irreverent audacious writing did not shy away from tackling the issue of Jewish identity in the United States, especially the generational c...

  • Rebecca

    When Larry’s father dies in 1999, sitting shiva at his sister’s house in Memphis is as much as he can cope with; he knows he’ll never manage to pray for his father’s soul for a whole year, as ...

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)

    "Larry is an atheist in a family of orthodox Memphis Jews. When his father dies, it is his responsibility as the surviving son to recite the Kaddish, the Jewish prayer for the dead, every day for elev...

  • Sherril

    Oy!! Where to begin? I’m of conflicting opinions when it comes to reviewing Nathan Englander’s newest work, kaddish.com. I want to give it four stars because I really like the author and the way h...

  • Michelle

    At first I wasn't sure if I would like this book but after about 50 pages or so I was reeled in. Not being Jewish myself I didn't understand a few of the Yiddish words and was unaware of some of the t...

  • Wendy Cosin

    Short and amusing, kaddish.com is about an American Jewish religious man's quest to properly say Kaddish for his father. Although I am Jewish, I didn't understand the what I assume are Yiddish words, ...

  • Jennifer S. Brown

    This book delighted me. A short but thought-provoking novel about a religious man who goes OTD (off the derech, aka, becomes no longer religious). His religious family insists he say kaddish, the mour...