North of Dawn

North of Dawn Review

A couple's tranquil life abroad is irrevocably transformed by the arrival of their son's widow and children, in the latest from Somalia's most celebrated novelist.

For decades, Gacalo and Mugdi have lived in Oslo, where they've led a peaceful, largely assimilated life and raised two children. Their beloved son, Dhaqaneh, however, is driven by feelings of alienation to jihadism in Somalia, where he kills himself in a suicide attack. The couple reluctantly offers a haven to his family. But on arrival in Oslo, their daughter-in-law cloaks herself even more deeply in religion, while her children hunger for the freedoms of their new homeland, a rift that will have lifealtering consequences for the entire family.

Set against the backdrop of real events, North of Dawn is a provocative, devastating story of love, loyalty, and national identity that asks whether it is ever possible to escape a legacy of violence--and if so, at what cost.

Title:North of Dawn
Edition Language:English

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    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • Sanura

    This is the story of an older Somali-Norwegian couple who take in their deceased son's wife and stepchildren, and this story follows these characters as they acclimate to Norway and their new family. ...

  • Ron Charles

    When Nuruddin Farah writes fiction about the ravages of terrorism, the details may be imaginary but the scars are real. The celebrated Somali novelist, a frequent contender for the Nobel Prize in lite...

  • Booknblues

    What happens to the citizens of a country when the country collapses and is considered a failed state? There are only so many answers, but they all center around survival and belief. Nuruddin Farah, a...

  • Cherise Wolas

    This is the first novel I've read by Nuruddin Farah, a frequent contender for the Nobel Prize in Literature. A writer from Somalia who now lives in Cape Town, South Africa, his own sister was killed i...

  • Paltia

    This novel is overly ambitious. If Mr. Farah had limited himself to the core ideas it would have been less jumbled up at the end. The story begins with parents living in Norway learning their son, who...

  • Stephanie

    A very interesting premise, but the flat, stilted dialog and writing ruined this book for me. I can't tell if it's just a really bad translation, which could be the case, as there are constant weird, ...

  • Nat

    1.5 starsA mildly interesting novel about Somalian asylum seekers' settlement into Norwegian society. It was bogged down with so much mundane detail and Mugdi seemed to have such an immense loathing f...

  • Dorothy

    Nuruddin Farah is a celebrated Somali novelist who is often mentioned as a contender for the Nobel Prize for Literature. He frequently writes about the effects and costs of terrorism in today's world ...

  • Peter

    Why is the dialogue in Farah's novels so stiltedly formal? Is it based on Somali (and also, in this case, Norwegian) speech patterns? Is it a kind of alienation effect, reminding us that these are aut...

  • Christopher Berry

    I loved this one! The story was very well told, the writing is superb! I was engaged with the characters throughout! I did however, feel that the ending was a bit rushed, and it would have fit better ...