In the Hurricane's Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown

In the Hurricane's Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown Review

The thrilling story of the Revolutionary War finale from the New York Times bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea and Valiant Ambition.

Here is the story of the remarkable year leading up to the siege of Yorktown. It sets Washington against his traitorous nemesis Benedict Arnold and places him in impossible situations and constant acrimonious negotiation with his French allies, along with his young protégé, the Marquis de Lafayette and his energetic general Nathanael Greene. In a narrative that moves from the ship-crowded waters off Newport, Rhode Island, to a wooded hillside near North Carolina's Guilford Courthouse, to the Dutch storehouses on the Caribbean island of St. Eustatius, Philbrick narrates the pivotal naval battle that brought the end of America's long, elusive path to independence. It was an improbable triumph made possible by Washington's brilliant strategy, leadership, and revolutionary use of sea power.

In the Hurricane's Eye opens in the fall of 1780. For five years, American and British forces had clashed along the edge of a vast continent and were now at a stalemate. The Royal Navy, with its fleet of powerful warships (just one of which mounted more cannons than possessed by the entire rebel army), could attack the rebels' seaside cities at will. The Rebels could just fall back inland and wait. Neither side could inflict the killing blow. As Washington knew better than anyone, only the French navy could break Britain's stranglehold on the eastern seaboard and thus ensure an American victory.

In the Battle of the Chesapeake (1781 - called the most important naval engagement in the history of the world), a French admiral foiled British attempts to rescue the army led by General Cornwallis. By making the subsequent victory at Yorktown a virtual inevitability, this naval battle--masterminded by Washington but waged without a single American ship--was largely responsible for the independence of the United States. A riveting and wide-ranging narrative, full of dramatic, unexpected turns, In the Hurricane's Eye reveals that the fate of the American Revolution depended, in the end, on Washington and the sea.

Title:In the Hurricane's Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown
Edition Language:English

    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • Kathleen

    Despite the Philbrick’s title, In the Hurricane’s Eye, Washington appears to be less of a genius than ‘lucky’ in the Victory at Yorktown. How so? Let me count the ways—o Washington’s geniu...

  • Book of the Month

    Why I love itby Siobhan JonesYears before landing the best job in the world—a.k.a. reading books for a living, a.k.a. Editorial Director at BOTM ;)—I was a middle school social studies teacher. Re...

  • Geoffrey

    (Note: I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley)For the overwhelming majority of us, the Battle of Yorktown is little more than a quick mention from our history textbo...

  • Nancy

    The defeated British army trudged out of the ruins of Yorktown to the slow beat of a drum, surrounded by the American militia on one side of the road and the French on the other. The British General a...

  • Craig Pearson

    Thank you to Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. It is much more interesting to a historian to read about a specific event in a larger period such as the Battle of Yorktown dur...

  • Rick

    Full disclosure: I received this book as an ARC. Here is my take. “In the Hurricane's Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown” by Nathaniel Philbrick was very entertaining...

  • Abby Morris

    I am absolutely fascinated with the events surrounding the American Revolution- call me a sucker for the most unlikely victories one could imagine- and I love an opportunity to dig in to the time peri...

  • Dan Downing

    Readers of history often forget that many authors are making an argument for a particular point of view. Mr. Philbrick certainly has an argument he is making, and he is clear about it. Further, in his...

  • Scott Martin

    Another good work from Philbrick, this one offers a take on the latter stages of the American Revolution, focusing on the naval actions associated with the French fleet that would ultimately help Wash...

  • Jeff J.

    A fascinating account of the Battle of the Chesapeake between the British and French navies, which culminated in the end of the American revolution at Yorktown. Too often this battle is overlooked in ...