A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness: Writings, 2000-2010

A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness: Writings, 2000-2010 Review

A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness features essays and poems by Cherríe L. Moraga, one of the most influential figures in Chicana/o, feminist, queer, and indigenous activism and scholarship. Combining moving personal stories with trenchant political and cultural critique, the writer, activist, teacher, dramatist, mother, daughter, comadre, and lesbian lover looks back on the first ten years of the twenty-first century.

Moraga considers decade-defining public events such as 9/11 and the campaign and election of Barack Obama, and she explores socioeconomic, cultural, and political phenomena closer to home, sharing her fears about raising her son amid increasing urban violence and the many forms of dehumanization faced by young men of color. Moraga describes her deepening grief as she loses her mother to Alzheimer’s; pays poignant tribute to friends who passed away, including the sculptor Marsha Gómez and the poets Alfred Arteaga, Pat Parker, and Audre Lorde; and offers a heartfelt essay about her personal and political relationship with Gloria Anzaldúa.

Thirty years after the publication of Anzaldúa and Moraga’s collection This Bridge Called My Back, a landmark of women-of-color feminism, Moraga’s literary and political praxis remains motivated by and intertwined with indigenous spirituality and her identity as Chicana lesbian. Yet aspects of her thinking have changed over time. A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness reveals key transformations in Moraga’s thought; the breadth, rigor, and philosophical depth of her work; her views on contemporary debates about citizenship, immigration, and gay marriage; and her deepening involvement in transnational feminist and indigenous activism. It is a major statement from one of our most important public intellectuals.

Title:A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness: Writings, 2000-2010
Edition Language:English

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    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • Erika

    A 'greatest hits' kind of book but, as someone who hadn't read the essays, the organization makes sense. I appreciated her honest reflection regarding the historic struggles she had with Anzaldua. The...

  • César

    Deep and significant. Several of the passages will reverb in my mind for years to come."Every barrio boy's death diminishes me."Me too, Cherríe, me too. ...

  • Lisa

    This book is deeply personal, and reflects on so many aspects of Moraga's life and relationships as a queer chicana feminist. The hurt she feels for diasporic people is evident. There are great pieces...

  • Irma Mayorga

    Maestra....

  • E

    Not an easy read but many interesting insights. ...

  • Sophia Nuñez

    I bought this book last spring, but reading it bit by bit after the election, Moraga's book has been the best medicine I have found for the various heridas abiertas of being a queer xicana in this cou...

  • Vicki

    Find my review for Lambda Literary here....

  • Edith

    This book definitely left me with a lot of food for thought and notes on the margins. ...

  • Veronica

    I couldn't resist buying this over the weekend! ...