1917: War, Peace, and Revolution

1917: War, Peace, and Revolution Review

1917 was a year of calamitous events, and one of pivotal importance in the development of the First World War. In 1917: War, Peace, and Revolution, leading historian of World War One, David Stevenson, examines this crucial year in context and illuminates the century that followed. He shows how in this one year the war was transformed, but also what drove the conflict onwards and how it continued to escalate. Two developments in particular - the Russian Revolution and American intervention - had worldwide repercussions. Offering a close examination of the key decisions, David Stevenson considers Germany's campaign of 'unrestricted' submarine warfare, America's declaration of war in response, and Britain's frustration of German strategy by adopting the convoy system, as well as why (paradoxically) the military and political stalemate in Europe persisted.

Focusing on the abdication of Tsar Nicholas II, on the disastrous spring offensive that plunged the French army into mutiny, on the summer attacks that undermined the moderate Provisional Government in Russia and exposed Italy to national humiliation at Caporetto, and on the British decision for the ill-fated Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele), 1917 offers a truly international understanding of events. The failed attempts to end the war by negotiation further clarify the underlying forces that kept it going. David Stevenson also analyses the global consequences of the year's developments, showing how countries such as Brazil and China joined the belligerents, Britain offered 'responsible government' to India, and the Allies promised a Jewish national home in Palestine. Blending political and military history, and moving from capital to capital and between the cabinet chamber and the battle front, the book highlights the often tumultuous debates through which leaders entered and escalated the war, and the paradox that continued fighting could be justified as the shortest road towards regaining peace.

Title:1917: War, Peace, and Revolution

    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • Joseph

    1917: War, Peace, and Revolution by David Stevenson is the history of a single year of World War I. Stevenson studied for his undergraduate degree at the University of Cambridge, before receiving a Ph...

  • John Plowright

    As the year of the German resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare, the Zimmerman Telegram and US entry into the First World War; Passchendaele or Third Ypres, Cambrai, and the mutinies in the Fre...

  • Stephanie

    Over the years, I have gone through periods of fascination (obsession?) with WW I, reading fiction and nonfiction. It’s always been something I never could quite get my hands around in terms of unde...

  • Casey Wheeler

    I received a free Kindle copy of 1917: War, Peace & Revolution by David Stevenson courtesy of Net Galley and Oxford University Press, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post ...

  • Michael Neiberg

    My review of this books is at: https://lawfareblog.com/pivotal-year...

  • Daniel Ligon

    Detailed but dry, David Stevenson's 1917 is a thoroughly researched political history of the fourth and penultimate year of the First World War. I enjoyed the international scope of the book, but felt...

  • Jason Park

    Very good history is somewhat overshadowed by dense storytelling. My full review: https://medium.com/@jpark_21/1917-war......

  • Armen

    One of the pivotal years of the 20th Century is given its due in this well written and informative book. Much in the style of other books that dealt with one year - 1865 and 1945 come to mind - David ...