Philanthrocapitalism: How the Rich Can Save the World

Philanthrocapitalism: How the Rich Can Save the World Review

An examination of how today's leading philanthropists are revolutionizing the field, using new methods to have a vastly greater impact on the world.

For philanthropists of the past, charity was often a matter of simply giving money away. For the philanthrocapitalists – the new generation of billionaires who are reshaping the way they give – it's like business. Largely trained in the corporate world, these "social investors" are using big-business-style strategies and expecting results and accountability to match. Bill Gates, the world's richest man, is leading the way: he has promised his entire fortune to finding a cure for the diseases that kill millions of children in the poorest countries in the world.

In Philanthrocapitalism, Matthew Bishop and Michael Green examine this new movement and its implications. Proceeding from interviews with some of the most powerful people on the planet—including Gates, Bill Clinton, George Soros, Angelina Jolie, and Bono, among others—they show how a web of wealthy, motivated donors has set out to change the world. Their results will have huge implications: In a climate resistant to government spending on social causes, their focused donations may be the greatest force for societal change in our world, and a source of political controversy.
Combining on-the-ground anecdotes, expert analysis, and up-close profiles of the wealthy and powerful, this is a fascinating look at a small group of people who will change an enormous number of lives.

Title:Philanthrocapitalism: How the Rich Can Save the World
Edition Language:English

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    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • Austin Carroll Keeley

    A decent introduction to the giving patterns of the 1%, but this book has several major failings. First, published in 2008 the book cannot take into account the changes in philanthropy due to the fina...

  • Nora

    Bishop is very naive in some ways- he definitely sees through rose-tinted glasses, believing the super-rich are the potential saviors of the modern world. The book lacks any kind of depth of understan...

  • Sally

    Perhaps because I just finished Zissner's "On Writing Well," I couldn't help but notice that this book needs a good edit. In particular, I almost stopped reading it right near the end when I found I j...

  • Ankur Maniar

    This is like an encyclopedia of the world of philanthrophy. You cant help but admire the amazing work which is being done by billionaires like Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Rockfeller Foundation, Oprah ...

  • Kressel Housman

    What an inspiring book! I knew a little of the philanthropy and activism of such famous folks as Bill Gates, Bono, Bill Clinton, and Oprah Winfrey, but this book gave real detail. The biggest surprise...

  • David Sasaki

    The "Oscars of philanthropy," the Clinton Global Initiative, took place last week in New York City. Here's a typical on-stage exchange:After Ben Affleck introduced Hillary Rodham Clinton, she heaped p...

  • Todd

    A book with some interesting stories, but really a book by liberals for liberals. The general tone is repeated amazement that capitalism and businessmen could actually help others.They also misreprese...

  • Shauna

    I'm kind of meh on this. The discussion of public-private partnership throughout the book was useful, but the notion that massive accumulation of wealth can undo the harm of, um, massive accumulation ...

  • Glenn Williams

    The authors have conducted and analyzed lengthy interviews with social entrepreneurs, wealthy individuals, successful business leaders and high profile global figures to substantiate a significant rel...

  • Michael

    Reads like the Reaganomics of philanthropic capitalism where it's up to the superrich to drive social good. Many great points about the merits of applying capitalistic principles to nfp work, but I th...