Washoku: Recipes from the Japanese Home Kitchen

Washoku: Recipes from the Japanese Home Kitchen Review

In 1975,Gourmet magazine published a series on traditional Japanese food —the first of its kind in a major American food magazine — written by a graduate of the prestigious Yanagihara School of classical cuisine in Tokyo. Today, the author of that groundbreaking series, Elizabeth Andoh, is recognized as the leading English-language authority on the subject. She shares her knowledge and passion for the food culture of Japan in WASHOKU, an authoritative, deeply personal tribute to one of the world's most distinctive culinary traditions. Andoh begins by setting forth the ethos of washoku (traditional Japanese food), exploring its nuanced approach to balancing flavor, applying technique, and considering aesthetics hand-in-hand with nutrition. With detailed descriptions of ingredients complemented by stunning full-color photography, the book's comprehensive chapter on the Japanese pantry is practically a book unto itself. The recipes for soups, rice dishes and noodles, meat and poultry, seafood, and desserts are models of clarity and precision, and the rich cultural context and practical notes that Andoh provides help readers master the rhythm and flow of the washoku kitchen. Much more than just a collection of recipes, WASHOKU is a journey through a cuisine that is rich in history and as handsome as it is healthful. Awards2006 IACP Award WinnerReviews“This extensive volume is clearly intended for the cook serious about Japanese food.”—Minneapolis Star Tribune“. . . scholarly, yet inspirational . . . a foodie might just sit back and read for sheer enjoyment and edification.”—Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Title:Washoku: Recipes from the Japanese Home Kitchen

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    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • Amanda Nuchols

    I have several Japanese cookbooks covering everything from hotpots to sushi, but Washoku is excellent because it covers everyday Japanese "home cooking." Andoh covers all of the basics, from what you ...

  • Elizabeth

    This cookbook is more practical than it first appears. I was afraid it would be more of a coffee-table book than something I could actually use, but it has useful guides to Japanese ingredients, cooki...

  • Jen

    The only possible problem I might have with this book is that I waited so long to buy it. This is a must-read for anyone contemplating setting up house in Japan, as well as those interested in Japanes...

  • Georgia Erwin

    I have bought this book twice, and I am about to buy it again. The first time, I was in my early twenties and just discovering traditional Japanese cuisine--my parents are from Hawaii so even though I...

  • Jessica Lau

    The book is filled with traditional Japanese dishes and preparing them with both traditional and modern techniques. I like the way the author explains what washoku is and the principles of Japanese co...

  • Lydia

    A beautiful book, made with careful thought and testing. Every ingredient is described in depth, and the pictures are inspiring. Much description is given to technique, with ideas for improving even y...

  • Jean

    Extensive and impressive! A trove of a great variety of dishes. Wish I owned instead of borrowed from the library. Akin to Memories of Philippine Kitchens....

  • Charlotte

    Washoku is not the end-all perfect beginners guide to Japanese cooking that I was promised. (Looks pointedly at all the glowing 5-star reviews.) There are admittedly some great features but Japanese c...

  • Rachel

    I enjoyed this cookbook better than the last one I reviewed from the author, Kansha Cooking. I thought it was better organized and easier to understand. Plus most of the ingredients were pretty access...

  • Leifer

    I'm still using this book almost every week. I want her to write more. it took me a bit to get into it, mostly because of the overwhelming vocabulary of cooking/food terms, but once I did I realized i...