Japanese Soul Cooking: Ramen, Tonkatsu, Tempura, and More from the Streets and Kitchens of Tokyo and Beyond

Japanese Soul Cooking: Ramen, Tonkatsu, Tempura, and More from the Streets and Kitchens of Tokyo and Beyond Review

A collection of more than 100 recipes that introduces Japanese comfort food to American home cooks, exploring new ingredients, techniques, and the surprising origins of popular dishes like gyoza and tempura. 

Move over, sushi.

It’s time for gyoza, curry, tonkatsu, and furai. These icons of Japanese comfort food cooking are the dishes you’ll find in every kitchen and street corner hole-in-the-wall restaurant in Japan—the hearty, flavor-packed dishes that everyone in Japan, from school kids to grandmas, craves.

In Japanese Soul Cooking, Tadashi Ono and Harris Salat introduce you to this irresistible, homey style of cooking. As you explore the range of exciting, satisfying fare, you may recognize some familiar favorites, such as ramen, soba, udon, and tempura. Others are lesser known Japanese classics—such as wafu pasta (spaghetti with bold, fragrant toppings like miso meat sauce), tatsuta-age (fried chicken marinated in garlic, ginger, and other Japanese seasonings), and savory omelets with crabmeat and shiitake mushrooms—that will instantly become standards in your kitchen as well. With foolproof instructions and step-by-step photographs, you’ll soon be knocking out chahan fried rice, mentaiko spaghetti, saikoro steak, and more for friends and family.

Ono and Salat’s fascinating exploration of the surprising origins and global influences behind popular dishes is accompanied by rich location photography that captures the energy and essence of this food in everyday Japanese life, bringing beloved Japanese comfort food to Western home cooks for the first time.

Title:Japanese Soul Cooking: Ramen, Tonkatsu, Tempura, and More from the Streets and Kitchens of Tokyo and Beyond

Enjoy the book review !

    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • Ryan

    I'm usually skip Japanese cookbooks as they tend to be more delicate flavors vs other cuisines and my heavy allergies don't let me taste subtleties. This book has a mix of traditional recipes (basic r...

  • Autumn

    For the price of about 3 bowls of noodles at my local Japanese spot, I have learned how to make soba for myself in about 20 minutes for the rest of my life. This book is a godsend. It's accessible for...

  • Devon Flaherty

    Japanese Soul Cooking, by Tadashi Ono and Harris Salat, published in 2013 by Ten Speed Press.This book is the first that I am reviewing from the Best Books: Food and Cookbooks list. I will try to revi...

  • Sammy C

    I wish I had actually cooked anything from this! As it is, I almost drooled on the book. everything looked so delicious! ...

  • Kevin

    awesome collection of recipes with photos and easy to follow directions...

  • Rachel

    I found this by accident in the new cookbook section at the library. I love Japanese food, so I’m always on the lookout for new cookbooks. I had heard of Tadashi Ono after watching the PBS show “I...

  • Cara

    3.5This had a surprising selection of easy recipes--lots of pictures and easy to follow instructions. ...

  • Marlee

    Wonderful read but I think I am just going to find a nice noodle place downtown....

  • Dean

    Really liked this book for its atypical focus away from the more rarefied aspects of Japanese cuisines (eg - sushi, kaiseki, etc) and instead cataloging 'everyday' Japanese comfort cuisine, the dishes...

  • Tony Cheang

    This review is from cooking only a few of the many recipes this book has to offer (gyoza, miso ramen with marinated eggs, kara-age, negoya tebasaki, okonomiyaki, yakisoba).First off, the quality of th...