Loving in the War Years

Loving in the War Years Review

Weaving together poetry and prose, Spanish and English, family history and political theory, Loving in the War Years has been a classic in the feminist and Chicano canon since its 1983 release. This new edition—including a new introduction and three new essays—remains a testament of Moraga's coming-of-age as a Chicana and a lesbian at a time when the political merging of those two identities was severely censured.

Drawing on the Mexican legacy of Malinche, the symbolic mother of the first mestizo peoples, Moraga examines the collective sexual and cultural wounding suffered by women since the Conquest. Moraga examines her own mestiza parentage and the seemingly inescapable choice of assimilation into a passionless whiteness or uncritical acquiescence to the patriarchal Chicano culture she was raised to reproduce. By finding Chicana feminism and honoring her own sexuality and loyalty to other women of color, Moraga finds a way to claim both her family and her freedom.

Moraga's new essays, written with a voice nearly a generation older, continue the project of "loving in the war years," but Moraga's posture is now closer to that of a zen warrior than a street-fighter. In these essays, loving is an extended prayer, where the poet-politica reflects on the relationship between our small individual deaths and the dyings of nations of people (pueblos). Loving is an angry response to the "cultural tyranny" of the mainstream art world and a celebration of the strategic use of "cultural memory" in the creation of an art of resistance.

Cherríe Moraga is the co-editor of the classic feminist anthology This Bridge Called My Back and the author of The Last Generation. She is Artist-in-Residence at Stanford University.

Title:Loving in the War Years
Edition Language:English

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    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • Don't really know how to write a review. Forgive me if I do this wrong.All I can really say, as an American Asian-Chicana Latina who has questioned everything in her life...probably more than once, Ch...

  • A highly politicized and propagandistic novel that includes indifferent poetry. The quasi-surrealistic story line posits that life for a Mexican-American lesbian amounts to life during a war; a propos...

  • This book made me want to write about my personal experiences with regards to feminism, sexism and racism. It is inspirational but also challenging in the sense that I don't know if I could ever under...

  • Lots of bad poetry; some really good poetry; lots of really interesting personal points, gender theory, and chicana theory, that are made far better -- and far more clearly -- than Anzaldua's Borderla...

  • so im still reading this and it is really intense and slightly frustrating because some of it is written in spanish and i dont know spanish but its a beautiful book with lots of really valuable and th...

  • I really wanted to love this book. I didn't hate it, but I didn't really like it either. She's smart and what she says make sense. It was just hard to get through. This was something I read for school...

  • Chicana, lesbian, woman, American, feminist, mixed race, Mexican. Cherríe Moraga writes on all of these identities in this collection of poems and essays that tell her life story (thematically, not c...

  • In this volume Moraga delves into personal experience, exploring her family's history, strengths and sadnesses in poetry and prose and in Spanish and English. Moraga writes about forging her identity ...

  • Moraga's "Loving in the War Years" is frequently a beautiful and moving experience-her writing is precise and engaging, her message is lucid, and you'll find yourself often wanting to highlight and re...

  • Just a note to say that the edition I read contained about 150 pages, while another widely reviewed edition of this work - with the same title - contains 264 pages. I don't know if the additional mate...