The Gate to Women's Country

The Gate to Women's Country Review

Tepper's finest novel to date is set in a post-holocaust feminist dystopia that offers only two political alternatives: a repressive polygamist sect that is slowly self-destructing through inbreeding and the matriarchal dictatorship called Women's Country. Here, in a desperate effort to prevent another world war, the women have segregated most men into closed military garrisons and have taken on themselves every other function of government, industry, agriculture, science and learning.

The resulting manifold responsibilities are seen through the life of Stavia, from a dreaming 10-year-old to maturity as doctor, mother and member of the Marthatown Women's Council. As in Tepper's Awakeners series books, the rigid social systems are tempered by the voices of individual experience and, here, by an imaginative reworking of The Trojan Woman that runs through the text. A rewarding and challenging novel that is to be valued for its provocative ideas.

Title:The Gate to Women's Country
Edition Language:English

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    Some Testimonial About This Book:

  • Bridget Mckinney

    One reviewer on Goodreads calls The Gate to Women's Country "gender essentialist, heterosexist, cissexist garbage," and it is, I suppose. First published in 1988, The Gate to Women's Country is very s...

  • Katie

    Gender essentialist, heterosexist, cissexist garbage. Avoid at all costs....

  • Spider the Doof Warrior

    I hate this book. Maybe I should read it again, but there's so many other books I want to read, so many other books I'd rather read again than this one.Maybe there was some sort of thing I missed the ...

  • Amy Sturgis

    Tepper offers a fascinating meditation on how a post-apocalyptic people might seek to limit the potential for future violence and thus avoid another devastating (presumably nuclear) holocaust. The div...

  • F.R.

    Well, here’s some fantastic feminist science fiction. ‘The Gate to Women’s Country’ takes gender roles, pushes them to the limit and sees a way to both destroy and rebuild them. It presents a ...

  • Christy

    On my second reading: I don't think I gave Tepper enough credit the first time I read this book. The treatment of homosexuality still bothers me. Although, as one commenter has said, it could be argue...

  • Amanda

    This is the book that introduced me to Sheri Tepper. It addresses questions of why humanity is so violent and possible solutions, of gender politics, of what a future might be like if men and women di...

  • Cara

    Of all the books by Sheri S. Tepper I have read, this is perhaps the most overtly feminist in that the post-apocalyptic society she describes is clearly matriarchal. Yet it is not an angry, man-bashin...

  • Greg

    I remember reading this book for a Science Fiction class I took in college. Unlike probably everyone else in the class, except for my friend Chris, I hadn't ever gone through a scifi phase, or ever li...

  • Kathleen

    I have found Tepper to be frustratingly uneven as a writer. When her stories take on what might be called a "feminist" theme, they don't work as well for me as those who explore other themes.This nove...

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